Posted on Leave a comment

Help me, I’m trapped somewhere between the 2nd and 3rd dimension.

I’ve started to make things in what I like to call ‘2.5 D’. Sometimes I take a picture that is already painted, cut it apart and then reconstruct it in various levels.

I’ve attached a quick video that demonstrates the cutting and another for the rebuilding.

Other times I begin with the drawing on board, cut out and around the shapes using a scroll saw. After that I paint the images on the separate parts, and then build the final piece. This is definitely the least scary of the two options. Either way the final effect is pretty much the same.

Anyway, that’s it for today. It may be the shortest blog post ever but it came with pictures so I must get points for that, right? – L/C

Posted on 1 Comment

Recording how sausage gets made

Smart phones are great for documenting the progress of a painting. It’s fun to be able to record how the sausage gets made. I find myself doing it more and more. It’s also good to be able to show people the process in stages.

I’m currently working on a commission that is based on a famous photo of the Beastie Boys. Yes, I have previously ranted about how much I dislike taking commissions but even I make the odd exception. I have always respected the fact that they didn’t spell Boys with a Z and for that reason alone am happy to pay homage. Also, money.

I’m also starting a painting of a hippo emerging from the water. I love the shape of hippos. To my mind, they are the reigning body-positive champions of the wild kingdom. They look so funny and harmless but are apparently surprisingly effective killing machines. Also, the ears are too funny.

Also doing a painting of a camel cigarette package. I guess it bridges the gap between animals (which I most often paint) and my recent foray/return to pop culture images. I recently did and painting based on a famous photo of Marilyn Monroe at the beach. Maybe the camel cigarette painting is my attempt to reconcile the two apparently opposite directions.

That’s all for now, Nicole. – L/C

Posted on Leave a comment

Listen to yourself

I wonder what advice that I would give my younger self if such a thing was possible. I also wonder if I would take that same advice now. Is it too late to take my own advice? Has the opportunity to take lessons from the things that I have learned in my life passed me by? Will I trust myself enough to take it?

Here is some of what I might say:
• Develop your own opportunities and don’t depend on others to do it for you.
• Learn other languages as soon as you can. It gets way harder as years pass.
• Invest in technology.
• Focus on your art.
• Enjoy your kids.
• Embarrass your kids for fun but not too often (that way there’s an element of surprise)
• Believe in yourself.
• Be a morning person.
• Maintain a healthy life.
• Connect with other people who do what you do.
• Work hard. Play nice.
• Don’t self-sabotage
• Don’t bother with twitter. Please follow me at @hummygoo (please, I’m begging you)

– LooseCanine

Posted on Leave a comment

Business is business, but art is not business.

Making and selling art is a tough slog. Beyond the time and effort involved, the costs are much higher than people realize. 

I doubt that most artists have a clear sense of how much they are actually spending to pursue their vocation. I tend to avoid doing so because I just don’t want to know. 


Between art supplies, transport, framing, it adds up very quickly. You also spend money on things like websites, business cards, invitations and other promotional items. Every time I go into an art store I am amazed by how much everything costs. Renting studio space, as many artists do, is a whole other world of financial pain.

Artists typically spend a lot of time making each piece of work. Most of us spent the requisite time and cash for formal studies, so there’s that. We’ve also spent years learning, developing, and practising our trade. All of that time and experimentation is critical to our overall development as artists. Lots of time, money and trips to the art store.

The majority of an artist’s production over the course of their career will likely never be sold. Also, brick and mortar galleries typically take a 50% commission. The 50% that’s left over for the artist gets eaten up pretty quickly by the expenses already mentioned. Even online galleries take 35%. 

Making art actually costs us money so we do other stuff to subsidize it. Geez, did I say this was a business? – L/C

Posted on Leave a comment

Overcoming Social Media Affected Disorder

As an artist, social media creates a whole new set of pressures and anxieties.

I’m not really sure what to do in order to post effectively. Am I supposed to hashtag a bunch of keywords as part of the post? Am I supposed to follow a whole bunch of people and then unfollow them as soon as they follow me? That seems to happen a lot in the often insidious world of followers, and likes. People can be so awful and disingenuous on social media. It makes me crazy.

The pressure comes from an expectation that you have to promote yourself and specifically your art on social channels like Twitter and Instagram and that you have to constantly grow your audience. Your following has to be big and constantly getting bigger. Size matters.

The anxiety comes when I post something and then compulsively feel the need to constantly check to see how many likes and or retweets the post has gotten. So far my social media savvy has proven to be underwhelming. But like I said, as an artist, I am made to feel that this is a necessary avenue of pursuit and something that needs to be mastered. Ahhhhh!!!!!! – L/C

IG: @loosecanine

T: @hummygoo